Rock & Roll Heaven

Bob Casale of Devo Dies of Heart Failure

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Submitted by Cashbox Canada

Bob Casale, one of the original members of the 1980’s rock group has died in New York on Monday, February 17, 2014.  Casale is the second member of Devo to pass on. Alan Myers died of stomach cancer in June 2013.

Bob Casale died of heart failure and was only 61 years old. He is survived by his wife Lisa and two children, Alex and Samantha.

Casale, or Bob 2, was a musician and sound engineer but was best known as guitarist and keyboard player for the new wave band, Devo. He was the brother of Gerald Casale. Casale, the founder of Devo, said, "As an original member of Devo, Bob Casale was there in the trenches with me from the beginning. He was my level-headed brother, a solid performer and talented audio engineer, always giving more than he got. He was excited about the possibility of Mark Mothersbaugh allowing Devo to play shows again. His sudden death from conditions that led to heart failure came as a total shock to us all."

In Devo concerts, Bob played lead/rhythm guitar and keyboards while working with MIDI sampling. He also sang backup vocals both on album and at live shows.Starting in 1984, Bob was the sound engineer for all of Devo's albums, including Shout, Total Devo, Smooth Noodle Maps andSomething for Everybody.

Pete Seeger To Everything There is a Season

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Submitted by Don Graham

"Every kid who ever sat around a campfire singing an old song is indebted in some way to Pete Seeger," Arlo Guthrie once said and truer words were never spoken

Pete Seeger, the banjo-picking troubadour who sang for migrant workers, college students and star-struck presidents in a career that introduced generations of Americans to their folk music heritage, died Monday at the age of 94. His grandson Kitama Cahill-Jackson​ said "He was chopping wood 10 days ago,"

Pete and Toshi Seeger were married July 20, 1943. The couple built their cabin in Beacon, New York after World War II and stayed on the high spot of land by the Hudson River for the rest of their lives together. The couple raised three children. Toshi Seeger died in July at age 91. Much like Johnny Cash after he lost his beloved June, Pete didn’t last long alone.

The lanky 6’2” Seeger  armed with his  banjo and full white beard was an iconic figure in folk music. He performed with the great  Woody Guthrie in his younger days and marched with Occupy Wall Street protesters in his 90s, leaning on two canes. He wrote or co-wrote If I Had a Hammer, Turn, Turn, Turn, Where Have All the Flowers Gone and Kisses Sweeter Than Wine. He lent his voice against Hitler and nuclear power.

Phil Everly: Bye Bye Love

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Submitted by Don Graham

Phil Everly, the high harmony voice of the iconic Everly Brothers with older brother Don, has passed away at age 74. A little more than 2 weeks away from his 75th birthday, Everly succumbed after a long battle with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He was a longtime smoker.

The Everly Brothers harmony singing had a strong influence on rock groups of the 1960s. The Beatles, The Beach Boys  and Simon & Garfunkel developed their early singing styles by performing  Everly covers. The Bee Gees, the Hollies and other rock'n'roll groups were influenced by The Everly Brothers.

The brothers started working together as part of their father Ike Everly’s radio show on KMA and KFNF in Shenandoah, Iowa, in the 1940s. Singing on the show gave the brothers their first exposure to the music industry. The family sang together and lived and traveled in the area singing as The Everly Family.

Chet Atkins, a family friend, was  an early supporter of The Everly Brothers and  even though he was affiliated with  RCA Records, he arranged a chance for the Everly Brothers to record for Columbia Records in early 1956. Their first and only single for the label, "Keep A' Lovin' Me," was a flop, and they were quickly dropped from Columbia.

Ray Price For The Good Times

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Submitted by Don Graham

Ray Price, one of country music's most popular and influential singers who had more than 100 hits and was one of the last living connections to Hank Williams, has died. He was 87. Price died Monday December 16, 2013 at his ranch outside Mount Pleasant, Texas, said Billy Mack Jr., who was acting as a family spokesman. Price was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2011 and it had recently spread to his liver, intestines and lungs, according East Texas Medical Center in Tyler. He stopped aggressive treatments and left the hospital last Thursday to receive hospice care at home. At the time, his wife, Janie Price, relayed what she called her husband's "final message" to his fans: "I love my fans and have devoted my life to reaching out to them. I appreciate their support all these years, and I hope I haven't let them down. I am at peace. I love Jesus. I'm going to be just fine. Don't worry about me. I'll see you again one day."

Some of his well-known recordings include "Release Me", "Crazy Arms", "Heartaches by the Number", "For the Good Times", "Night Life", and "You're the Best Thing That Ever Happened to Me". He was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1996.

Phil Chevron of The Pogues Dead from Cancer

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Submitted by Cashbox Canada

Phil Chevron, of the legendary Anglo-Irish folk-punk band the Pogues died on October 8, 2013 after a long battle with cancer with his family by his side. He was 56 years old.

The Pogues became a successful Celtic punk band formed in 1982 and fronted by Shane MacGowan. The band reached international prominence in the 1980s and early 1990s.

Their politically tinged music combined punk music with traditional Irish instruments such as the tin whistle, cittern, mandolin and accordion. The Pogues were founded in Kings Cross, a district of Central London, in 1982 as Pogue Mahone—pogue mahone being an Irish translation of the Irish word póg mo thóin, meaning "kiss my arse".

Chevron joined the Pogues in 1984 and became a core member as the group made its name internationally with several albums including "Rum, Sodomy and The Lash" (album title is a famous comment falsely attributed to Winston Churchill who was supposedly describing the "true" traditions of the British Royal Navy) and "If I Should Fall From Grace With God".

Pete Haycock Climax Blues Band Dead at 62

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Submitted to Cashbox Canada

Guitarist Pete Haycock, a founding member of Climax Blues Band, died on Wednesday in Germany after suffering an apparent heart attack, the U.K. band's official website reports.  He was 62.
Haycock was part of the Climax Blues Band lineup from 1967 to 1985, and contributed to the group's biggest hits.  These included 1976's "Couldn't Get It Right" and 1981's "I Love You," which reached #3 and #11, respectively, on the Billboard Hot 100.

After leaving the band, the guitarist moved to Germany, where he focused on composing movie scores.  He also played for a few years with ELO Part 2, an Electric Light Orchestra spinoff group founded by that band's original drummer Bev Bevan.  This year, Haycock formed his own version of Climax Blues Band, but, according to ClassicRockMagazine.com, his health issues limited his participation in the group.

The tribute on the Climax Blues Band's website called Haycock "one of the finest exponents of slide guitar of his time, and a great singer," noting that along with fellow founding member Colin Cooper (who died in 2008) "he supplied the integral and fundamental guitar and sax sound that contributed to making the band so popular."
Meanwhile, Robin George, lead singer of Haycock's current group, has written his own homage to his band mate, saying, "If he wasn't the best blues guitar player in the world, he was definitely in the top one!"

Lou Reed 1942-2013

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Submitted by Cashbox Magazine

Lou Reed, rock pioneer singer/songwriter and guitarist, has passed away in Long Island, New York at age 71. The cause of death had not been released at press time but Reed did undergo a liver transplant in May of this year.

In the late sixties Reed was part of the band The Velvet Underground formed by  Reed and John Cale. who would also go on to find success as a solo artist.
Although experiencing very minimal commercial success while together, the band is often recognized by critics as one of the most important and influential groups of the 1960s. In a 1982 interview Brian Eno made the  statement that while the first Velvet Underground album may have sold only 30,000 copies in its early years, "everyone who bought one of those 30,000 copies started a band."

The band caught the attention of Andy Warhol who managed them and made them the house band at his studio, the Factory.. The provocative and unfiltered lyrics of some of the band's songs gave their music an irreverent feel and suited the Warholian crowd to a tee.

Their 1967 debut album, The Velvet Underground & Nico (which featured German singer Nico, with whom the band collaborated), was named the 13th Greatest Album of All Time and the "most prophetic rock album ever made" by Rolling Stone Magazine in 2003.In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked the band No. 19 on its list of the "100 Greatest Artists of All Time” The band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996, by Patti Smith.

In Memory of Charles Frederick Mavety: August 15, 1950 –September 25, 2013

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Marianne's Faithful Canadian Guitarist Joe Mavety – Originally Published October 2010

By Bill Delingat

Marianne Faithful is back again with her new C.D. “Easy Come, Easy Go”. Her 1979 comeback album “Broken English” was hailed as a breakthrough LP since her hit “As Tears Go By” and her legendary romance with Mick Jagger. What the music world didn’t know was the co-writer of “Broken English, “why d’ya do it” and “what’s the hurry” as well as the riveting guitar.

Joe Mavety was born August 15, 1950 to Charles and Norma, and grew up in Kleinberg on the Circle “M” Ranch. Mavety credits his start on the guitar to the big dance hall at the ranch where they had an old stand up piano. Mavety wanted to play it but was too small to get up on the stool, he found an acoustic guitar and would pick it up and play by ear. Later he decided to take music seriously and studied at the Myles Davis School of Music. His high school music teacher Charles Le Pointe introduced him to jazz guitarist Lenny Breau who became a good friend and a coach for Joe right up to his death in August 12, 1984.

Joe Mavety Passes Away

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Submitted by Cashbox Canada

Cashbox Canada would like to express sadness the passing of Joe Mavety. Bill Delingat, one of Mavety’s oldest friends, announced that Joe had finally lost his battle with lung cancer on September 25, 2013 at The Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto, Canada.

Friends and fans are being asked everyone respect their privacy at this time and to remember Joe as the most wonderful man and musician he was. There will be at Joe's request a big party in his memory for all his friends at a later date TBA. Further to his wishes there will be no funeral, but a celebration of his life at a later undetermined date.

This week a new web site has been launched just prior to his sudden death. There are still a few bugs to work out, but it will play using Internet Explorer. Please enjoy his music and pictures at www.joemavety.com

We will keep you updated about any further plans for celebrating the musical life of Joe Mavety.

Rhythm and Blues for Bobby Dupont 1950-2013

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Submitted by Michael Williams
Photos Courtesy of Nick Panaseiko Sr.

When I arrived in Canada in 1974-1975, I was looking for the basics, a haircut, soul food and soul music.

It’s a black American thing, but pretty universal you want to know where the comfort and love is in a strange place. So not finding the basics, I turned to music. I had no idea that Canadian radio was so hostile to Soul efforts by Canadian artists. One of the first Canadian soul bands I ever saw from Toronto was Sweet Blindness, with vocalist Bobby Dupont, one of the sweetest blue eyed soul singers the country had produced. A contemporary of George Olliver, it is bittersweet his last performance was with him to celebrate George Olliver's 50th Anniversary Concert at Toronto's St. Clements Hall. The first time I heard him I had booked Sweet Blindness in Montreal at Loyola University, I was the DJ and host, and they were great. In 1976 they had three songs on the radio.

Sweet Blindness is music you can ride on, Cowboys to Girls and Quebec an instrumental classic which was their biggest song in Quebec .So it did not matter if they were English, it worked!

Last week I got the news that a great voice in Canadian Soul Music history has been forever silenced, Bobby Dupont had passed away leaving me with many questions that could be answered by Nick Panaseiko Sr. who worked the Sweet Blindness record at Quality records back in the days of 1975.

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