Features

FRIENDS DAY 2010, the Beginning

Friends Day 1

By Bill Delingat

ZEN – Friendship
“To Love People who love you is easy. Choose to be everyone’s friend, whether they like you or not. When you love and accept others as they are you will have friends everywhere.”

Elaine Tennyson is such a person and when she walks into the room everyone becomes aware of her dynamic presence. Elaine was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia and moved to the metropolis of Toronto with her family at a young age. Elaine’s charm and beauty soon brought her into the high fashion modeling scene as a young teen and off she went to New York to pursue her blossoming career. On returning to Toronto for a visit Elaine decided to pursue her love for art deco and opened a 20th Century design store Red Indian Art Deco with her partner in the downtown core. Elaine also produced events and sold her couture designs at the store and soon utilizing her enormous list of clients founded Elaine Tennyson Enterprises (E.T.E.)

A PR franchise was born and the Toronto event scene would never be the same as her unique approach to fashion shows and special events would have an impact and reshape the industry, so much so that this incredible woman was dubbed by the National Post as a “PR Powerhouse.”

After a couple of tragic years of losing many friends, Elaine decided to give back to her friends and also initiate the idea for others to follow and acknowledge her vision of a day designated for friends to celebrate with each other - “Friends Day.”

Rockit88 Blasts Off In A New Direction

Rockit 88

By Lenny Stoute

It’s been six years since this country’s had “Too Much Fun” and that’s not Rockit88’s fault. Core members Bill King (keyboards, vocals) and Neil Chapman (guitars, vocals) stay busy making music. So busy they’ve not had the time to get back to Rockit88 until now.

Six years later, the boys are back in town with new members, a new sound and a whole new persona, several steps away from the deep-dish blues of the debut album. The new album’s Sweet Sugar Cane, the new backline’s Lionel Williams on bass and groove merchant Jim Casson working the skins and our host is the smooth-talking Bill King.

“ The first album, being that it was all covers, was more about the playing, with emphasis on the piano and guitar. This one is more focused on the songs and maintaining a consistency of style across 12 tracks”.

That style would be swampy country blues rock, cut with essence of the Rolling Stones and Little Feat at their most down home. Those are tough sailin’ shoes to fill, but Chapman and King found themselves well up to the task. Another daunt about this style of music, it can be a tough row to handle the vocals credibly. The vocals on Sweet Sugar Cane get their authority from King’s uncanny ability to locate the appropriate period nuances for each song. Vocal output is further boosted by the recent addition of Stacey Bulmer.

Jo Hikk Ain’t Looking For Kicks

Cover July 30, 2010

Jo Hikk’s front guy Kelly Sitter talks quietly about upcoming album ‘The Game’, near-fame and how it all came about
by Lenny Stoute

“If this is the highest level the band ever gets to and if this is the happiest I’ll ever be, then I’m real good with that” As Granny might say, “Now there stands a man happy in his skin” and if she’s talking about Kelly Sitter, the ol’ dame’s right on the money.
The defining voice of Alberta country band Jo Hikk is at home with the kids in his small-town hometown the day Cashbox Canada called up. Sitter describes a leisurely paced life, with lots of time between rehearsals to check out the local baseball games and play a few gigs. In the background is the knowledge that all this could change big time after August 10, the release date for Jo Hikk’s much-anticipated sophomore album, ‘The Game’.

What is Old is New again…..The New York Dolls

New York Dolls

What is Old is New again…..

"The New York Dolls created punk rock before there was a term for it. Building on the Rolling Stones' dirty rock & roll, Mick Jagger's androgyny, girl group pop, the glam rock of David Bowie and T. Rex, and the Stooges' anarchic noise, the New York Dolls created a new form of hard rock that presaged both punk rock and heavy metal. Their drug-fueled, shambolic performances influenced a generation of musicians in New York and London, who all went on to form punk bands. And although they self-destructed quickly, the band's two albums remained two of the most popular cult records in rock & roll history. All of the members of the New York Dolls played in New York bands before they formed in late 1971. Guitarists Sylvain Sylvain (who named the band), Johnny Thunders and Rick Rivets, bassist Arthur Kane, and drummer Billy Murcia were joined by vocalist David Johansen. Early in 1972. The group began playing regularly in lower Manhattan, particularly at the Mercer Arts Center. 

Now in 2010 the Dolls are back embarking on the road one more time with the help of the new media “the internet” that has brought their sound and story to new listeners and old fans alike inspiring a cross country tour to bring the show back “live on stage”.


Fans corner: New York dolls Burlington songfest June 19 2010

Don't Believe Your Own Hype

KBP

by Keith Bradford

Keith Bradford is Executive Director of Cashbox Magazine, Nashville Tennessee. Mr. Bradford is also the director of NBRN.FM, owner of KMA Records, and also runs Keith Bradford Promotions.
Bradford is in the pre-production of the release of his new DVD Series, The Music Business – Ya Gotta Luv It!
Cashbox Canada is pleased to present weekly excerpts from this series to be released in 2011.

Be very cautious about starting to believe your own PR that is or was created for you.  All too often Artists start believing what is being said about them either by fans or professional publicity agencies whose job is to make the artist look bigger than they really are? 

In some instances the promoter does it all as a platonic relationship and innocently stretches the truth, just a bit to make the artist appear to be a star.  In other scenarios the manager/promoter has a serious infatuation with the artist (sometimes bordering on idolatry) and anything and everything that can be said to make the artist feel great about themselves is all used in the promotion. 

This doesn't seem to hurt anyone but the artist themselves.  When the time comes for the artist to produce the goods as we say in the business, they fall down and the embarrassment begins.  All too often an artist is booked almost solely on their hype and after a miserable performance they are informed they won't be back. 

Don't believe everything you read or hear about yourself.  It can be dangerous. 

The Music Business Ya Gotta Luv It.

Kenny G Plays for the Children

Cover July 23, 2010

by Bill Delingat

Kenny G was born June 5, 1956 as Kenneth Bruce Gorelick in Seattle, Washington and who would have known then that after seeing a sax player on The Ed Sullivan Show, he would develop the talent and the skills of a modern day snake charmer, swooning his audience into an almost trance-like state, with his soothing style of music that brought him to the status of Grammy Award winner for adult contemporary and smooth jazz. Kenny G brought his heart-melting sound to help raise funds and awareness for the Shriners Hospitals for Children on July 1st and 2nd 2010, as part of the Shriners Imperial Council Session Conference at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre.

The Shriners Hospitals for Children is a health care system of 22 hospitals, dedicated to improving the lives of children by providing specialty pediatric care, innovative research and outstanding teaching programs. Children up to the age of 18 with orthopedic conditions, burns, spinal cord injuries and cleft lip and palate are eligible for admission and receive all care in a family-centered environment with no financial obligation to patients or families. http://www.shrinershq.org/Hospitals/Main

Do You Get The Point?

KBP

Have you ever heard, "Oh don't worry about that, it is just a typo error?" Let's take a look at a . ( dot, or for the old folks a period) in the wrong place. You just got your BMI, ASCAP or SOCAN royalty check. Which one of these typos would you prefer?
 
$ .10   $1.00   $100.00   $1000.00   $10,000.00
 
Do you get the point (no pun intended)? A typo as simple as a misplaced dot can cause havoc in cyber space. The music business is tough enough. Not paying attention to intricate detail will make it tougher.  This detail must be followed through with websites, e-mail addresses, and any and all printed media.  Be sure and memorize the correct name of your website and e-mail account and where your product is for sale.  All too often I have interviewed someone and asked for that information and the person would say I am not sure about all that.  Someone else takes care of that for me. 
The music business – YA GOTTA LUV IT!
*Keith Bradford is an on-air personality in Nashville, Tennessee on nbrn.fm.
Mr. Bradford is also owner and operator of Keith Bradford Promotions and KMA Records, which specializes in tracking, promotion and marketing of country music.

Bill King & Joey Cee - All That Jazz

Cover July 16, 2010

FOR CASHBOX MAGAZINE
The Beaches International Jazz Festival has been fashionably Jazz for 22 years!
by Joey Cee

With 22 years under our belt, the Beaches International Jazz Festival has gone from a community day in the park to an international phenomenon. Clearly this music festival has defied the odds and grown into Canada’s leading free Jazz Festival.

Unlike other Jazz Festivals that have cropped up throughout the country, and around the world, the Beaches International Jazz Festival has stayed true to its roots and grown with the times. It’s ongoing success and continued survival is attributed to the hard work of the organizing team headed up by founder and producer Lido Chilelli, artistic director Bill King, the vast array of entertainers, the hundreds of volunteers, the thousands of dedicated visitors and most importantly - our sponsors and government partners. The fact that this festival has grown year after year without charging a cent for admission, is a feat in itself.

The Two Countries of Country – Keith Bradford Cashbox Nashville talks to Canadian Don Graham

Cover July 10-2010

by Keith Bradford

Recently I interviewed Don Graham by telephone and he was gracious enough to answer the following questions and many more that I have edited from this article. The Toronto Tunesmith Graham is leaving at the end of July to tour with Texas Troubadour Larry Patton in Norway, Ireland, and Austria.
 
 
KB:  Tell me a little bit about yourself – how does a guy from Montreal, Quebec end up in country music?
DG: "I could only get one Country Music radio station in the 60's and even then it was only on a clear night.  It was WWVA in Wheeling, West Virginia.  I loved the commercials.  You could order 500 baby chicks for $3.99 or something like that; that fascinated me.  I really enjoyed hearing the music of Marty Robbins, and Hank Williams."

KB: You had a pick hit in Cashbox Magazine in the late -70’s – how does it feel to be on the cover now?
DG: "I used to read CASHBOX Magazine when I was a kid working in a record store.  I read all the trades working in that store. Years later, I looked in there and saw I had a pick hit in the magazine called, "Shelter In The Sky." with my band, Graham County. It has come full circle because here I am again. To be on the cover after all these years is very special."

K.B. : When you had those singles out on the Kapp Record label, your MD and guitarist was Bill Hill (producer of April Wine, etc.) Now he is the producer on this CD. Tell me about how that all came to be?

The Two Countries of Country – Canadian Sandy Graham interviews Larry Patton, The Honky Tonk Cowboy

Cover July 10-2010

by Sandy Graham I recently had the pleasure of chatting with Larry Patton, a talented Texan now living in Nashville, Tennessee. This unassuming man, with the list a mile long of greats he has played with, is about to embark on a tour to promote his new CD, ‘A Strange Night’, on the Canadian-owned ‘Breakin’ Records label. SG: tell me a little bit about yourself – how did a Texas born kid who grew up on rock and roll end up living and working in Nashville? LP: My mother was not just a rock-n-roller, she was also an avid country music fan. She took me to every country music show that came to town. In June of 1957 we went to the Grand Ole’ Opry in Nashville and saw the Everly Brothers first appearance there. I moved to Nashville the first time in 1975, went to work with Ronnie Milsap and then later that year Hank Williams Jr. After Hank’s mountain climbing accident in August, and the band’s three months in New Mexico and Arizona, I moved back to Texas at the end of that year. In 1986, with several job offers in hand, I moved back to Nashville and have been here ever since. SG: You have been in many bands over the years, with big name acts. (IE Willie, Hank etc.) there must be some interesting stories from all that experience – what is your favorite story? LP: Back when I was with Johnny Bush, we played a gig at a mental institution in east Texas, along with Willie Nelson and Ray Price. As we approached the gate with all three buses in a row, I got out only to be greeted by a short little man smoking a cigar and dressed in a military uniform like General Patton.

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