Features

Touching Bass With Alain Caron

Alain Caron

By Tristan Stagg, Halifax NS

Canadian world renowned bassist Alain Caron, is best known for his work with the 1980's jazz fusion group UZEB. In his career, Alain has teamed up and toured internationally with the Mike Stern Trio, the Leni Stern Band, as well as the CARON-ECAY-LOCKWOOD trio. Since then, Alain has released numerous solo albums such as "Rhythm and Jazz", "Call me Al”, "Play", and most recently in 2006, "Conversations". After two tours of Europe and playing at several major jazz festivals in Canada earlier this year, Caron is back on his game with the release of a new solo album early this fall.

Cashbox had the opportunity to speak with Alain about his past and what is next to come.

TS: Who were your influences growing up?

Alex Cuba On Fire

Cover Sept 25, 2010

Alex Cuba On Fire

By Lenny Stoute

The Alex Cuba story is a uniquely Canadian one. Just ask the Cuban born musician, who lives in the British Columbia town of Smithers B.C amid giant trees and a mountainous backdrop. Better than 1,000 kilometers from Vancouver, it's home to Alexis Puentes (Cuba’s real name), his Canadian-born wife, their three children and a pair of Junos.

The Canadian Country Music Association (CCMA) and the 2009 Awards

Cover September 18, 2009

By Sandy Graham

The Canadian Country Music Association (CCMA) is a federally chartered, non-profit professional trade organization whose purpose is to: protect the heritage of; advocate the development of; and enact laws favourable to the Canadian country music industry domestically and internationally.

Since 1976, the CCMA has been committed to ensuring the growth of the Canadian country music industry. Through education, communication, information, promotion and recognition, the CCMA offers members these advantages in an increasingly competitive environment. Core to our efforts is Country Music Week. It is the focal point for our organization and members, and provides professional development, showcasing opportunities, and an opportunity to heighten awareness and increase exposure for Canada's country artists.

TransmitTALKS, TransmitLIVE, TransmitNOW

International music industry think-tank in BC
By Karen Bliss

Transmission 2009 is set to take place in Victoria, British Columbia, Sept. 22 to 26, bringing together industry heavyweights to debate and determine solutions facing the music business and opine about its future.

This year’s transmitTALKs, as the conference portion is called, presented by RIM, will be located in Crystal Gardens.  There will be more than 60 roundtable discussions focusing on emerging markets such as Brazil, Russia, India and China; the present and future role of copyright in music; and the required skills and qualifications of “next generation leaders.”

Featured speakers include music producer and media professor Sandy Pearlman; online book pioneer Hannes Brun, president and CEO of Abe Books; and David Hyman, Internet innovator and founder/CEO of music content site MOG.

Changing the Model of Symphony Orchestra Management

By Rob Tomaro, Classical Music Editor of Cashbox Magazine

Fallout from the downturn has orchestra managers reeling.   Even before the economy went south, the traditional management model was creaking with age and leaking at the seams.  Something had to be done, and it took a perfect storm to put change into motion.

The elements of this storm collided at the outset of 2008: the graying of the audience, diminishing sponsorship, decreasing audience numbers, and increasing competition for consumer entertainment dollars.  Then, in a coup de gras, the stock market tumbled and orchestra endowments from Maine to Oregon  doubled over and yelled for mama.  We're just beginning to dig ourselves out from under the rubble.

But good things have come out of it. Smart Boards realized they had an opportunity to tighten up an outmoded management model and bring it into this century.

Johnnie Lovesin: 50 years of Rock ‘n’ Roll

By Bill Delingat

Johnnie Lovesin, the Veteran rocker from Val D'Or, Quebec, got his start in the mid-1960's when he moved to Toronto to what would become the hub of the flower power scene in Toronto‘s Yorkville. Johnnie spent much of his time pan- handling, busking for change and playing with whoever would listen and most bands did.

By the mid 70’s Johnnie was known as  'Crazy John' Lovesin and he was planning to form a band called “Black Ballet”.With his charisma and  smile, he gained the attention of the promoters of  some of the biggest rock festivals around,  becoming a popular figure backstage at arena events. Several bands later ,Johnnie went on to call himself the “Ace from Space” and formed his now legendary show,” Johnnie Lovesin And The Invisible Band” and caught the attention of  cutting edge promoters “The Garys”.

The Boogie Man's Back

Alan Gerber

By Bill Delingat

Alan Gerber was born in the windy city of Chicago; both his mother and father were music lovers, his mother played the piano and his father enjoyed singing. Alan's older sister became quite talented as a pianist and there was always a baby grand piano in the house for Alan to experiment on.

Alan credits his two uncles for inspiring him to get into the music field as they both also played the piano and loved the jazz and blues, although they never played professionally. Alan enjoyed jamming with his uncles as a kid and also credits the Chicago scene for getting him hooked on playing.

O Canada ! There are Stars on King

Cover September 11, 2010

By Sandy Graham

The concept for a Walk of Fame in Toronto, to honour famous Torontonians was first conceived in 1996, by founder and current President, Peter Soumalias. The Board of the Toronto Entertainment District Association was not keen on the idea, so Soumalias went on to create and establish The Walk of Fame for Canadians in partnership with Bill Ballard, Dusty Cohl and Gary Slaight. In spite of a lack of funds, research and no media plan, they managed to succeed and the first class of inductees was inducted in 1998. The Walk of Fame has since become a popular tourist attraction in Toronto and has been named the number one Canadian recognition event.

No More Buggy Whips

WCMA looks at bright side of music biz

By Karen Bliss

The Western Canadian Music Alliance, made up of five industry associations Alberta Music, Manitoba Music, Music BC, Music Yukon and SaskMusic, is taking a more proactive, positive direction for the topics at the 2009 WCMA conference in Brandon, Manitoba, Sept. 17 to 20.

“A lot of the organizations, including ours, have talked a lot about ‘the sky is falling,’ and all this terrible stuff, and we decided this year that that’s over,” explains Rick Fenton, executive director of the WCMA. 

“The way we start the conference guide is ‘Congratulations: you’ve survived the recession, illegal downloading, a massive downturn in CD sales, major label restructuring and the erosion of the concept of intellectual property and despite all this you are making a living in the music biz,’” recounts Fenton.

Meet The Music Maestro Rob Tomaro

By Sandy Graham

Dr. Robert Tomaro is an award-winning composer, musician, recording artist and symphonic conductor. He is in his tenth year as Music Director and Conductor for the Beloit Janesville Symphony Orchestra and is executive producer on numerous CD's with the BJSO. Prior to the BJSO, he founded the Elysian Symphony Orchestra in New Jersey, where he served as Music Director.

Dr. Tomaro holds the Shogren Family Conducting Chair as Professor of Music at Beloit College in Wisconsin and is a member of Kappa Delta Pi and Pi Kappa Lambda, the national honor societies in education and music education, and a winner of the New Jersey Council on the Arts Fellowship Award for Symphonic Composition.  In 1991, he was appointed as an Honorary Member of the Board of Directors of the Association Nationale de Musique de Chambre in Paris.

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