Features

THE JUNOS CELEBRATE 40 YEARS IN TORONTO, CANADA

Drake t the Juno Awards

Photo and Story Courtesy of CARAS

 

 HOT ON FIRE! ARCADE FIRE NABS FOUR JUNO AWARD WINS -Neil Young honoured with Allan Waters Humanitarian Award- -Bryan Adams welcomes Shania Twain to Canadian Music Hall of Fame- Toronto, ON (March 27, 2011) – A royal procession of Canadian music stars took to the stage for Canada’s biggest night in music, THE 2011 JUNO AWARDS. CTV’s special two-and-a-half hour anniversary broadcast of the Awards blew the roof off the Air Canada Centre with power-packed performances, tributes to 40 years of the JUNO Awards, and eight winning categories announced. THE 2011 JUNO AWARDS is now available on demand at junos.CTV.ca. 

 

Terry Sumsion: “THE BEST FRIEND A COUNTRY SONG EVER HAD”

Cover, April 1, 2011

“THE BEST FRIEND A COUNTRY SONG EVER HAD” 

Submitted by:  Randy Owen, Country 107 3, Tillsonburg, Ontario

That was how a band member would introduce the late Conway Twitty.  When introducing Terry on stage, I would sometimes mention that quote and said it also applied very appropriately to Terry Sumsion.

Last night, Saturday, March 26, 2011, Terry took his last breath.  Terry Sumsion has passed away at the age of 64 after a courageous, three-year-battle with esophegeal cancer at a hospice in Brantford, Ontario, surrounded by his loving family.

Born February 7, 1947 in the small town of Burford, Ontario, the former truck driver would establish himself as one of the most powerful voices in country music, of country music, and for country music in Canada.  The story of his early years is not much different from that of other country singers, slugging away in bars, playing smoke-filled dives, and driving unimaginable distances just to get to the next gig, hoping for a chance at stardom.

But Terry was different.

OMDC HOSTS JUNO NOMINEES PARTY AT THE ROYAL YORK HOTEL

OMDC Photo Credit Natasha Slinko

By Sandy Graham

Photo Credit Natasha Slinko

 

There has been a really cool commercial on television this last year featuring the likes of icons like Molly Johnson, Tomi Swick, Alex J Robinson, Justin Hines, The Arkells and Toya Alexis singing There’s No Place Like This – Ontario.

 

It seems this is true to fact with this year’s nominees for the 40th Juno Awards Celebrations. According to OMDC data, 78 Ontario-based acts and companies collectively have earned 103 Juno nominations this year, and 56 of the acts are affiliated with independent, Ontario-owned or controlled record labels, publishers, and managers.

 

Emphasizing the importance of the music industry to the province’s new millennial economic strategy, Tourism & Culture Minister Michael Chan stated that “Ontario’s music industry is a pillar of our rapidly growing entertainment and cultural sectors, contributing over $20 billion annually to our province’s economy.”

 

FACTS FROM THE OMDC:

SYLVIA TYSON……WRITE ON !!!!

Cover March 25, 2011

By Don Graham

Sylvia Tyson is an accomplished songwriter, an art that requires telling a story with a beginning, middle and an end all squeezed craftily into a three minute and twenty second capsule. Most songwriters would love the opportunity to expand on that formula and Sylvia has found just that vehicle by writing a novel, “Joyner’s Dream”, (published by HarperCollins) a multigenerational family epic that starts in 18th century England, goes to Halifax at the time of the Great Explosion and ends in present day Toronto. It spans 200 years in it’s 420 pages and as Tyson said “It didn’t have to rhyme!” In keeping with her background, Tyson’s story, of course, includes a family’s love of music and a certain violin! There is also an 11 song CD of new material, written by Tyson and inspired by “Joyner’s Dream.”

Steve Anthony – Today

Cover March 18, 2011

By Sandy Graham 

With the 40th Anniversary of the Junos coming up, Cashbox Canada would like to pay homage to some of the music industry icons who have “built this city on rock ‘n’ roll.” On a summer night in August 1984, Much Music was launched in part to capitalize on the success of MTV, the American cable music channel that had premiered a little bit earlier.  It was the innovative brainchild of Moses Znaimer, and his on-air ‘vee-jays’ were personalities in their own right. Along with Erica Ehm, Michael Williams, Christopher Ward and JD (John) Roberts there was also the blonde haired blue eyed zany kid, Steve Anthony.

Now a co-host on the hugely popular CP 24 Breakfast show in Toronto, Steve Anthony has grown into the role of a serious broadcaster, while maintaining his outgoing personality that won him such popularity in his early days on radio and television.

Cashbox had the opportunity to ask a few questions of how the career of this music loving guy got to where he is today.  

When and how did you start in radio?

The year? 1972. Marconi had just invented the radio the year before. And all was good. At the tender age of 14, my big brother, Ron, took me under his wing and let me sit in with him on his radio show at McGill University. A mix of eclectic music and chat that got me hooked.

Jevon Rudder Releases New Single – “Oh Yeah” in Canada and the U.S.

Jevon Rudder Photo by Taffi Rosen

by Natasha Slinko


 


Great news as Jevon Rudder is scheduled to release his song “Oh Yeah” on Thursday March 17th, 2011, directly after Canadian Music Week.  “Oh Yeah” is an upbeat song that will get you up on your feet dancing to lyrics that tell the tale about a girl  ‘with take me home eyes` and who has ‘one hand on the jukebox and the other in the air’ and ‘she goes wild every time, she hears Tim McGraw, she wears daisy dukes and cowboy boots and dances on the bar’.  And trust me you`ll have one hand up in the air singing `Oh Yeah`.




This is a song of celebration and the independent woman that is out to have a good time and will not apologize to anyone for having her cake and eating it too, all the while having a good time in the process. It seems fitting that this song is being release just a week after the 100th Anniversary of International Women`s Day on March 8th that is celebrated globally. May all women know that they have the choice of this freedom to dance and yell  “Oh Yeah” .




Born in Toronto Ontario, the city of multi-culturism and multi-music, Rudder`s style is influenced by various genres outside of country, such as rock ‘n’ roll, rhythm and blues and reggae, but through his album The Good, The Bad & The Lucky, Rudder shows us that he is the embodiment of country. 



The Legendary Cheiftains Return to Toronto To Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day

Cover March 11, 2011

By Sandy Graham

When it was announced that The Cheiftains would be making a one night appearance in Toronto (and their only stop in Canada on a whirlwind tour of North America) Cashbox Canada made every effort to get a one on one with the legendary celtic music maestro himself, and Patrick Moloney did not disappoint us.

When I first called the hotel to speak to ‘Paddy’ as he is known amongst his friends and fans, I was delighted to hear a down to earth, friendly voice that obviously still loves every minute of still making music.

Canadian Music Week

Cover March 4, 2011

Canadian Music Week began in 1981, and has grown to become one of Canada’s largest and most influential media and music conferences. It draws top industry professionals to participate in a four-day program of activities. Designed to stimulate the exchange of market intelligence, increase dialogue and provide networking opportunities, Canadian Music Week continues to present the ideal platform for more than 2,000 national and international delegates.

CMW is the single longest running multi-day Canadian music festival that manages to consistently bring together more than 2,000 music industry professionals for the week's events - combining conferences, award shows, & one of Canada’s biggest "New Music" festivals. Throughout the duration of the event, performers put on shows at venues ranging from popular bars and halls, to trendy clothing stores and cafes. Many emerging new bands use the festival as an opportunity to 'get spotted' by the A&R reps that are around in greater than average numbers during the festival. 

Studio Trix

Music City Logo

By now everyone who is conscious on the planet has heard we live in a disposable society.  Recently we had a major breakdown with our equipment in the recording studio.  I started calling all the electronic repair places I could find listed in the phone book to see about getting our gear repaired so we could continue doing business.  The first technician told me there would be a $75 bench fee to diagnose the problem.  In the event that there were no problems detected there was no refund on the bench fee.  I didn't think that sounded right so I called the manufacturer.  They told me I would have to find the original box and all packaging that came with the equipment and to ship it to them for repair.  The equipment I am talking about at that moment was 5 years old.  All the boxes and packing supplies that came with the purchase were tossed in the dumpster years ago.  I was also told if I could find all the original packing that it could take 6 - 8 weeks to get it back.  In the meantime we kept getting further and further behind in the studio work.  We then found on line a new and up-graded version of what we were using and it was on sale.  We opted to purchase all new gear and toss the old.  Just this week we found out our equipment has been discontinued and no repair facilities will be able to help us in the event it doesn't work any longer.  So should we repair or toss every time a crisis comes up?  I hope you don't have to make that decision none too soon.  It is costly and frustrating beyond belief. 

The Irish Are Among Us - In Celebration of St. Patrick!

Cover Feb 25, 2011

by Sandy Graham

When I asked (Toronto’s Irish Person of the Year) 2010 Hugo Straney how many people he thought were of Irish descent in the GTA, his answer was ‘More claim they have Irish ancestry in Canada than any other group in the world. I believe the statistic would be around 300,000 in Toronto alone.”

In 1847, over 100,000 Irish immigrants migrated to Canada in what would be the result of the infamous potato famine. Nearly 40,000 of these people passed through Toronto, which at the time had a population of just under 20,000. In the summer of 1847, 863 Irish people died in the fever sheds that were erected at what is now Toronto’s thriving theatre district at King Street West and John Street. In total 1,100 people lost their lives during this tragic time, many died trying to nurse the sick back to health.  Next time you walk the streets of downtown Toronto, look for the plaque erected in their memory.

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