Features

Digging Roots

Digging Roots

By Lenny Stoute

Digging Roots is a Kama Sutra kind of band, one that can assume some very unique positions. There’s that genre defying sound in a class by itself, they’re a rock world rarity with dual frontpersons and while they can bang a gong for the sheer rawk’n’roll of it with the best of ‘em, they’re also capable of issue-inspired lyrics sharp as a steppin’ razor. Duality is in the marrow of this band as reflecting its nature as a collaboration between Shoshona Kish and Raven Kanatakta to cut holes in the far fences of roots music.

Reached at the couple’s woodsy central Ontario home on a mellow fall afternoon, Shoshona is pleased to talk about the collaborative process of creating Digging Roots music.

Without a Net: The Imani Winds in Concert

Imani 1

By Rob Tomaro, Classical Music Editor

When you walk onstage to perform with a chamber ensemble, you're flying without a net.  A musical net is any structure that provides the glue that holds everything together.   In an orchestra or a jazz band, for example, rhythm is pumped along by a percussion section and the underlying harmony is represented in the orchestration or, at the very least, the piano.  But when the Imani Winds took the stage at Beloit College in Beloit, Wisconsin, they didn't need drums or pianos or anything else. They created a dazzling landscape of color, and it came from the inside out.

The classical  woodwind quintet is comprised of flute, oboe, clarinet, french horn, and bassoon.  And what holds it together is an implicit, internalized pulse that passes through the members of the group like an invisible ball of energy they toss around in a circle. Hot potato. And it never gets dropped.

Watching Paint Dry: Banging Through the Stigma of Classical Music

Tomaro

By Rob Tomaro, Classical Music Editor of Cashbox Magazine

"You want me to do what? Do you realize the Canucks are in the playoffs tonight? But, instead, you want me to put on a tie and go see your cousin's kid play the violin? Are you nuts?"

This vituperous outburst, or something quite like it, occurs regularly around exasperated moms, wives, nieces and the like as they try to drag recalcitrant hubbies, brothers and significant others to symphony concert halls all across North America. Most guys would rather be yanked down into the caves by Morlocks than sit through Brahms.

The question of how and why this seemingly impenetrable wall went up around the classical music performance experience in our culture has long frustrated pundits and duffers, alike.  

Touching Bass With Alain Caron

Alain Caron

By Tristan Stagg, Halifax NS

Canadian world renowned bassist Alain Caron, is best known for his work with the 1980's jazz fusion group UZEB. In his career, Alain has teamed up and toured internationally with the Mike Stern Trio, the Leni Stern Band, as well as the CARON-ECAY-LOCKWOOD trio. Since then, Alain has released numerous solo albums such as "Rhythm and Jazz", "Call me Al”, "Play", and most recently in 2006, "Conversations". After two tours of Europe and playing at several major jazz festivals in Canada earlier this year, Caron is back on his game with the release of a new solo album early this fall.

Cashbox had the opportunity to speak with Alain about his past and what is next to come.

TS: Who were your influences growing up?

Alex Cuba On Fire

Cover Sept 25, 2010

Alex Cuba On Fire

By Lenny Stoute

The Alex Cuba story is a uniquely Canadian one. Just ask the Cuban born musician, who lives in the British Columbia town of Smithers B.C amid giant trees and a mountainous backdrop. Better than 1,000 kilometers from Vancouver, it's home to Alexis Puentes (Cuba’s real name), his Canadian-born wife, their three children and a pair of Junos.

The Canadian Country Music Association (CCMA) and the 2009 Awards

Cover September 18, 2009

By Sandy Graham

The Canadian Country Music Association (CCMA) is a federally chartered, non-profit professional trade organization whose purpose is to: protect the heritage of; advocate the development of; and enact laws favourable to the Canadian country music industry domestically and internationally.

Since 1976, the CCMA has been committed to ensuring the growth of the Canadian country music industry. Through education, communication, information, promotion and recognition, the CCMA offers members these advantages in an increasingly competitive environment. Core to our efforts is Country Music Week. It is the focal point for our organization and members, and provides professional development, showcasing opportunities, and an opportunity to heighten awareness and increase exposure for Canada's country artists.

TransmitTALKS, TransmitLIVE, TransmitNOW

International music industry think-tank in BC
By Karen Bliss

Transmission 2009 is set to take place in Victoria, British Columbia, Sept. 22 to 26, bringing together industry heavyweights to debate and determine solutions facing the music business and opine about its future.

This year’s transmitTALKs, as the conference portion is called, presented by RIM, will be located in Crystal Gardens.  There will be more than 60 roundtable discussions focusing on emerging markets such as Brazil, Russia, India and China; the present and future role of copyright in music; and the required skills and qualifications of “next generation leaders.”

Featured speakers include music producer and media professor Sandy Pearlman; online book pioneer Hannes Brun, president and CEO of Abe Books; and David Hyman, Internet innovator and founder/CEO of music content site MOG.

Changing the Model of Symphony Orchestra Management

By Rob Tomaro, Classical Music Editor of Cashbox Magazine

Fallout from the downturn has orchestra managers reeling.   Even before the economy went south, the traditional management model was creaking with age and leaking at the seams.  Something had to be done, and it took a perfect storm to put change into motion.

The elements of this storm collided at the outset of 2008: the graying of the audience, diminishing sponsorship, decreasing audience numbers, and increasing competition for consumer entertainment dollars.  Then, in a coup de gras, the stock market tumbled and orchestra endowments from Maine to Oregon  doubled over and yelled for mama.  We're just beginning to dig ourselves out from under the rubble.

But good things have come out of it. Smart Boards realized they had an opportunity to tighten up an outmoded management model and bring it into this century.

Johnnie Lovesin: 50 years of Rock ‘n’ Roll

By Bill Delingat

Johnnie Lovesin, the Veteran rocker from Val D'Or, Quebec, got his start in the mid-1960's when he moved to Toronto to what would become the hub of the flower power scene in Toronto‘s Yorkville. Johnnie spent much of his time pan- handling, busking for change and playing with whoever would listen and most bands did.

By the mid 70’s Johnnie was known as  'Crazy John' Lovesin and he was planning to form a band called “Black Ballet”.With his charisma and  smile, he gained the attention of the promoters of  some of the biggest rock festivals around,  becoming a popular figure backstage at arena events. Several bands later ,Johnnie went on to call himself the “Ace from Space” and formed his now legendary show,” Johnnie Lovesin And The Invisible Band” and caught the attention of  cutting edge promoters “The Garys”.

The Boogie Man's Back

Alan Gerber

By Bill Delingat

Alan Gerber was born in the windy city of Chicago; both his mother and father were music lovers, his mother played the piano and his father enjoyed singing. Alan's older sister became quite talented as a pianist and there was always a baby grand piano in the house for Alan to experiment on.

Alan credits his two uncles for inspiring him to get into the music field as they both also played the piano and loved the jazz and blues, although they never played professionally. Alan enjoyed jamming with his uncles as a kid and also credits the Chicago scene for getting him hooked on playing.

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