Music

Soul Music’s Silver Lining Bounces Back With New Album

Liberty Silver

By Lenny Stoute

Lock up the boys. Liberty Silver’s back and hot times are on the horizon. After stepping out of the spotlight to deal with a family tragedy stemming from a fatal house fire, the major mama from Mississauga is set to drop her first album in five years, Groove Symphony, later this month.

It’s an extremely significant one for Liberty, not only as a career benchmark but also as musical memorial to her father, gravely ill at the time of interview, who was a bone deep inspiration to the lady. “Essentially I had to step up and take responsibility for raising two of my granddaughters. I felt family was more important than career and I acted on that.

“ To be honest I thought it would be easier, but now I just use more beauty aid. Everything coming into the house is strictly monitored and we do a lot of family things together. I knew that the music could always wait. I’m always family first, because I know when you do work hard, you do get rewarded. And I don’t buy into a lot of fame and bling things. I’ve seen a lot of that, enough to know what the value of that is. Especially compared to the value of other things.”

“Once the kids were on the right track, I was ready to get back to making music. There was such a backlog of emotions and ideas, once I sat down I had all the writing done in a month. I was born to make music and so I knew when the time was right it would all come pouring out.”

Rockit88 Blasts Off In A New Direction

Rockit 88

By Lenny Stoute

It’s been six years since this country’s had “Too Much Fun” and that’s not Rockit88’s fault. Core members Bill King (keyboards, vocals) and Neil Chapman (guitars, vocals) stay busy making music. So busy they’ve not had the time to get back to Rockit88 until now.

Six years later, the boys are back in town with new members, a new sound and a whole new persona, several steps away from the deep-dish blues of the debut album. The new album’s Sweet Sugar Cane, the new backline’s Lionel Williams on bass and groove merchant Jim Casson working the skins and our host is the smooth-talking Bill King.

“ The first album, being that it was all covers, was more about the playing, with emphasis on the piano and guitar. This one is more focused on the songs and maintaining a consistency of style across 12 tracks”.

That style would be swampy country blues rock, cut with essence of the Rolling Stones and Little Feat at their most down home. Those are tough sailin’ shoes to fill, but Chapman and King found themselves well up to the task. Another daunt about this style of music, it can be a tough row to handle the vocals credibly. The vocals on Sweet Sugar Cane get their authority from King’s uncanny ability to locate the appropriate period nuances for each song. Vocal output is further boosted by the recent addition of Stacey Bulmer.

What is Old is New again…..The New York Dolls

New York Dolls

What is Old is New again…..

"The New York Dolls created punk rock before there was a term for it. Building on the Rolling Stones' dirty rock & roll, Mick Jagger's androgyny, girl group pop, the glam rock of David Bowie and T. Rex, and the Stooges' anarchic noise, the New York Dolls created a new form of hard rock that presaged both punk rock and heavy metal. Their drug-fueled, shambolic performances influenced a generation of musicians in New York and London, who all went on to form punk bands. And although they self-destructed quickly, the band's two albums remained two of the most popular cult records in rock & roll history. All of the members of the New York Dolls played in New York bands before they formed in late 1971. Guitarists Sylvain Sylvain (who named the band), Johnny Thunders and Rick Rivets, bassist Arthur Kane, and drummer Billy Murcia were joined by vocalist David Johansen. Early in 1972. The group began playing regularly in lower Manhattan, particularly at the Mercer Arts Center. 

Now in 2010 the Dolls are back embarking on the road one more time with the help of the new media “the internet” that has brought their sound and story to new listeners and old fans alike inspiring a cross country tour to bring the show back “live on stage”.


Fans corner: New York dolls Burlington songfest June 19 2010

SLOW MOTION VICTORY

Slow Motion Victory

By: Morgan Lovsin

Slow Motion Victory, or “SMV” is a young Canadian, up and coming alternative rock band from Brantford, Ontario. They were formed in 2009 by vocalist Toby Bey, 23, and guitarist Quentin “Q” Carter, 20. They later teamed up with guitarist Henry Dowling, 18, bassist Kyle Bowlby, 21, and drummer Nathan Bolla, 22.

The band is currently playing a Toyota Corolla tour across different locations in Ontario, promoting songs from their upcoming debut LP Life in Motion, which is also the title of their newest single. The track ‘Life in Motion’ is a captivating tune that could also be considered an anthem for the band. Extremely motivating, and unbelievably emotional, this powerful song will have you banging your head, dancing, and singing the lyrics for days.

The band has also taken pro-active stances in regards to tragedies taking place in the World. In March they played a live show for the event, “Shelterbox Fundraiser for Haiti”, in which they helped raise proceeds for the Earthquake ravaged country. The event was a success and the lyrics of the track ‘Life in Motion’ could have had you believing they were made specifically for the awful tragedy in Haiti.

As Toby Bey, Quentin Carter, Henry Dowling, and Kyle Bowlby hammer out the lyrics “We Won’t Back Down…Not For Anyone!” in sync during ‘Life in Motion’, it is hard to avoid goose bumps, and to not shout along. The passion they express in those 7 words describes their journey from where they have been, to where they have come, and for where they plan to go.

Kensington Sound Studios

Kensington Sound

On Sunday May 16, 2010, Kensington Sound celebrated 38 years in the Canadian music scene, producing some of Canada’s top artists records, jingles and voice overs and continues to offer the opportunity to make young musicians dreams come true. This also marked the new partnership with tread FIRE Music that has lead to a funky new upgrade and renovation of the studio bringing it down from the second level to the ground floor. Vezi, a seasoned musician himself and one of the original founders of the studio, hosted the event, held next door at the Graffitis Bar, 170 Baldwin St., Toronto, with an open stage for entertainment. The street was packed, as friends and the curious stopped by to be part of the great music and food while Vezi offered tours of the new studio, located next door through the lane that brings you back to a part of Toronto’s music history. Vezi is in the process of writing a book on the years of events that crossed the doors of the studio, recounting many favorite Kensington Sound memories. If you have some of your own stories, experiences or pictures from those days be sure to let him Vezi know.

CASHBOX CANADA’S NXNE LIVE FIVE

by Lenny Stoute

Intro: Amid the hustle’n’hype of NXNE, check this handful of acts rarely seen in Toronto and tres deserving of attention.

WHITEBOY SLIM

The artist known as Whiteboy Slim (Maurice Richard Libby), started life as the band known as Automatic Slim, the transformation occurring when the group blew up and the Toronto native took off out West.

Automatic Slim was an immediate force on the Toronto blues scene, getting attention for its quirky take on the genre, the quirk courtesy of Slam’s time at Berkelee College of Music in Boston, where his classmates included pianist Al Copley (co-founder of Roomful of Blues) and go-to soul bassist Ron McClure.

The hard-gigging unit played all the notable clubs in the city and for a time Automatic Slim was the house band at four different clubs on different nights of the week. Burned out with the T.Dot and armed with a growing national reputation, Whiteboy Slim had no probs impacting on the Western blues scene, playing all the major fests including Sasktel Jazz Festival, The Mid-Winter Blues Festival, The Prairie Arts Festival and the Flatland Music Festival.
Through all that, what didn’t change and hasn’t still, is Slim’s dedication to his very own brand of the blues; a blend of experimentalism and strict traditionalism that’s never boring.

Canadian Rocker Johnnie Lovesin Celebrates his 61st Birthday 

Johnny Lovesin and Sons

by Bill Delingat

Lovesin got his start playing in Yorkville in the heyday of peace, love and rock n roll, busking and pan handling to the curious tourists who came to gawk at what became the hippie love generation.  
 
By 1969 he was putting his own band together, “Black Ballet” which Lovesin would later claim to those that would listen ,that he would be crowned the “King of Rock n Roll” at the historic Lennon, “Rock n Roll Peace Festival” at Varsity Stadium. Lovesin made it as far as back stage using his all familiar “gift of gab”, but that was as far as he got to getting crowned. Oddly enough some 40 years later John Brower the rock promoter with vision that put the event together is making a movie of that historic concert called “John Lennon Ate my Lunch” formerly known as “Rock War Peace. This year also marks what would have been Lennon’s 70th birthday and the city of Liverpool is planning the “John Lennon Tribute season” Oct 9th (Lennon’s Birthday) to Dec 09, 2010 (a day after his death) with daily tribute shows at the “Cavern Club” along with a “Lennon Remembered” Memorial Concert Dec 9th at the Echo Arena. Now, if you were one of the lucky ones to attend Toronto’s Peace Festival you may recall the limousines arriving from Pearson International with an unusual escort of 50 Bikers on Harleys rolling into the backstage area escorting Lennon and the plastic Ono band as well as the “Doors”. Brower has been in contact with Lovesin to use his “Vagabond Song” during that scene in the movie of this grandiose entrance.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RlaqgVdAaz0

Cashbox Nashville Party Pics

Downtown Nashville

Check out th epictures from our "Cashbox Nashville Party Pics" .
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ROCK WAR PEACE

John Brower
By Bill Delingat

If you were one of the lucky ones to be part of the Summer of Love 1969 in Toronto, Ontario, you will recall that surreal moment when a thunderous sound interrupted the music from the concert stage, as everyone looked to the sky expecting to see an EMS helicopter or a news chopper overhead. What in fact was the perpetrators of this noise was a chopper of a different kind as an escort of motorcycle club members cleared the path as they lead in the fleet of limousines containing the stars of the day’s event, John Lennon and Yoko along with the Plastic Ono Band. (Full story in Cashbox Canada archives)

At this year’s Canadian Music Week, the powerhouse team of Brower and Saunders, writers and developers of this historic film project arrived to flog their wares to the place and people that made it all a reality 40 years ago. Cashbox had a chance to ask a few questions and they got the answers from the illustrious Mr. Brower.

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN - GARY CHARLES QUINN 1954 -2009

Gary Quinn

By Bill Delingat

It was around a year ago when the phone rang and Marty Williams said “Belson, what’s up?”, the usual response was answered with the reply,” I have bad news for you it’s Quinn, he’s dead.” Well, unfortunately it was true after the 3 of us and other old friends had just recently reacquainted at yet another compadre’s funeral, (Platinum Blonde) Kenny McLean. The story goes that when he couldn’t be reached his best friend from school days (and ‘roomy’ at one time) Chris Bernard discovered that “Quinn,” as he was called by his friends, had passed away. Leaving behind his 3 beloved Siamese cats and his Gibson Guitar on his lap as he sat waiting to move on over to the other side. It is unfortunate when close friends pass on like Kenny McLean and Gary Quinn, less than 6 months apart and ironically enough, both very talented musicians.

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